A Celebrant May Be The Answer To Your Covid Affected Wedding

More and more people are using celebrants to officiate at their ceremonies and they have become even more popular in the wake of the recent Government restrictions. Celebrant weddings do not need a licence which gives couples and venues much more freedom in where they tie the knot.

The Manchester Celebrant, Leanne Gateley has spoken to Your Local BURY and has explained the role of a celebrant to Your Local BURY “My job is to create and deliver stunning ceremonies – usually weddings, funerals and baby naming ceremonies. 2020 has certainly been a year that has kept us all looking for new ways of doing things! Many weddings have had to be postponed this year, some being postponed twice, three and four times over. This has brought about an influx of micro weddings; couples simply didn’t want to wait any longer. They re-evaluated what was important – it wasn’t the big fairy-tale wedding; it was their love and commitment that mattered”. She has also received enquiries about vow renewal ceremonies or blessings as couples may have had the legal marriage but still want the wedding of their dreams at a later date, with a ceremony personalised to reflect them and their unique personalities.

Funerals are also an important part of Leanne’s work “Families that didn’t get the funeral that they would have wanted for their loved one due to restrictions are coming to me for memorial services. Together we create a real celebration of life memorial, which can be fun and reflect truly who that person was by incorporating their personality. I think that some of the new style celebrations will be here to stay as people want choice and they want unique celebrations – and that is what Celebrants do best!”

 

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